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Tomorrow I will publish the two shortstories “Dust” and “The Road” in a Kindle e-book at Amazon.

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Blixt: The Next Generation

Yesterday I had a nice author interview. The Swedish teacher in my youngest daughter’s class had instructed the students to write an essay about an author. So my daughter decided to write about the one she knows best, i.e. science fiction & fantasy author Anders Blixt. She therefore interviewed me for half an hour about my books The Ice War and Spiran och Staven and what inspires me to write. I spoke a lot about my memories of the Balkan War in 1990s, Afghanistan in 2008, the Apollo project in my childhood and other sources of inspiration.

En kopp dieselsmakande kaffe

Idag träffades Uppsalapoeten Mohamed Omar och jag över en kopp kaffe på Ofvandahls konditori för att prata rollspel, svensk rollspelshistoria, dieselpunk, steampunk, Sherlockiana, gotik och mycket annat. En mycket trevligt möte. En del av samtalet har nu placerats på hans blogg Nya il Convito länk >>>

Real-life revolutions vs fictional revolutions

As a consequence of the French revolution, the French introduced the meter and the kilogram successfully, but failed to make decimal hours popular.


Rebellions against tyrannies are exciting, at least in fiction: Luke Skywalker and buddies taking on the Empire, Katniss and Peeta standing up against Capitol, and so on. I, too, have written about the subject in the novel Ice War, which is loosely based on the European revolutions of 1848.

However, carrying out such grand political schemes frequently have unforeseen consequences: for instance, the Frenchmen calling for tax reforms in 1789 could not imagine that their actions would lead to Napoleon, a military dictator, killing off much of Europe’s youth in a world-spanning set of wars merely one decade later. Once again, I have touched that subject in my fantasy roleplaying game Gondica and my novel Spiran och staven which takes place in the same world. There a popular revolt against an oppressive monarchy has drastic consequences that nobody predicted. After all, a violent revolution tends to devour its own activists; look at the fates of Danton, Robespierre, Trotsky, and marshal Tukhachevsky.

Here is an interesting web article looking at various aspects of this subject and explaining why reality gets far messier than fiction — link >>>

A Clocktech Automaton

This programmable mechanical marvel would fit perfectly into Vidonia, the main geographical region of my renaissance fantasy role-playing game Gondica and my novel Spiran och staven. The Mechanurgist magician-artificers in that culture construct devices like this, though often even more fantastic.

I also think that it could be appropriate technology in the Swedish 18th-century horror RPG Götterdämmerung.