Roswell Artwork

Roswell, New Mexico, 1947: one of those legends that ought to be true. Click on the picture for a larger version.

I could probably use this picture to create a campaign setting for the Swedish RPG Sci-Fi! (link >>>) — if I just had more spare time on my hands.

Here are some notes on a Roswell-themed Traveller hack — link >>>

 

Loren Wiseman in Memoriam


The veteran game designer Loren Wiseman passed away yesterday. He worked for many years at GDW with both board games and role-playing games and after the demise of that company, he produced GURPS Traveller for Steve Jackson Games. His former colleague Marc Miller has written the following eulogy:

I first met Loren Wiseman more than forty years ago: he was one of the small group who played games in the University Union at Illinois State University, and a fountain of knowledge about history in general and ancient history specifically. When Frank Chadwick, Rich Banner, and I created Game Designers’ Workshop, we immediately added Loren to our partnership because he was a solid, dependable, and insightful friend. I have never regretted being in business with Loren.

Loren designed the fifth game published by GDW: Eagles, Rome on the Rhine Frontier, AD 15. He had a catchy concept: retrieving lost Roman legion standards (the Eagles) from the Germanic tribes, and he did an excellent job that made us proud. We were equally proud (and a bit jealous) when Avalon Hill picked up the game and published it under their banner. He followed up with Pharsalus, a board wargame of the Roman Civil War 48 BC in 1977.

Loren did a variety of jobs at GDW and they shaped everyone’s perception of him. He ran the warehouse at a time when everything was done with pen and paper and by hand. When we created the Journal of the Travellers’ Aid Society, he became its editor.

Loren also was the line developer for Twilight: 2000. The process at GDW was for the designer to write the text, but the developer brought together that text and some draft diagrams and some art needs, typeset it, and then made sure it was properly published. It also fell to Loren to design titles in the series (out of 46 supplementary titles, he is credited with designing 20).

After GDW closed its doors (in 1995), Loren moved to Steve Jackson Games in a variety of roles, including editor of their Journal of the Travellers’ Aid Society online edition.

Along the way, Loren was recognized for his excellence and expertise: with the H G Wells Award for Going Home (1986), and the H G Wells Award three years running for the Journal of the Travellers’ Aid Society (1979-1980-1981). In 2004, Loren received perhaps the highest of honors within the gaming community: he was inducted into the Adventure Gaming Hall of Fame, and the above recounting of his credits gives some insight into why.

But I remember Loren as a friend and a game player. I remember he and I both in a board game competition at GenCon many years ago. I rarely play games, and so I was gratified to make the finals, but in the end Loren beat me. That is what the industry he loved is about: friendly competition, with an emphasis on “friendly.”

Loren is the chap who put me on the professional game designing track. I started playing Traveller in 1978 and in 1979 I bought the first issue of Journal of Travellers’ Aid Society, GDW’s inhouse magazine for the game. Loren served as its editor. He accepted my first submission surprisingly quickly and for many years he kept on accepting my Traveller articles with only an occasional and well-explained rejection. I still have a photocopy of the first cheque he sent me way back in 1980 (more about that here — link >>> ).

In 1990 I had the pleasure of meeting Loren face to face at a Swedish game convention in Sundsvall, where he was the guest of honor. A pleasant chap in all regards. He will be missed by all in the game industry.

A salute to his memory:

My 2016 — a summary

When a year approaches its end, it is tempting to summarize it in a few bullet points. So here are my significant SF/fantasy/RPG experiences in 2016, listed in chronological order.

  • Collaboration of the year: Gustaf Gadd and I wrote Skymningshavets gåtor, a seafaring fantasy campaign book for Drakar och Demoner, during the spring.
  • Boost of the year: I received the Swedish RPG Dragon Award at Gothcon in April.
  • Book of the year: I read and re-read Agent of the Imperium, an complex and enjoyable science fiction novel in the Traveller universe by Marc Miller.
  • RPG campaign of the year: We were Pinkerton agents investigating a murder in New Orleans in early 1870.
  • Boardgame of the year: Terraforming Mars by Fryx Games — wow!
  • Tragedy of the year: Evert Johansson, one of my old Traveller buddies, suddenly passed away in November at age 58.
  • Movie of the year: Rogue One.
  • TV-series of the year: Agent Carter S1 — yes, I know it is not new, but I did not have a chance to watch it until a few weeks ago.

Venus-safe Technology Is Hard to Get

NASA is currently investigating what materials and devices could be used for future Venus landers. The planet’s hellish environment degrades even stainless steel quickly, so research probes have so far ceased to function within two hours after touchdown. The Glenn Extreme Environments Rig is a 14-ton testing chamber that recreates Venus’s toxic, corrosive, and hot surface conditions.

Read more here — link >>>

Kickstarter: Traveller Customizable Card Game

Those gamers that have known me for a long time, also know that one of my all-time favorite RPGs is Traveller (read my opinion about it here — link >>> ), a space-faring game in the far future, where you take the roles of interstellar traders, spies, rogues and explorers. Its creator Marc Miller has spent the last decade or so refreshing its cosmos, among other things by writing a good novel about exploration, hazards and politics in the human-dominated Third Imperium: Agent of the Imperium (you find it here — link >>> ).

Marc has now licensed a Traveller customizable card game, which just has been launched on Kickstarter (check the project here — link >>> ). I think this is a cool project, and the game’s solo-player option makes it even more interesting, at least to me.

A scene straight out of the game: the seamy aspect of interstellar business in the Third Imperium. Click on the picture for a larger version.

Alternate Earths

The World Dream Bank is a great resource for people wanting develop alien worlds or alternate Earths. It provides several well-reasoned planets with maps and texts, including terraformed Mars and Venus. Link — >>>

The example below is a future Earth where the polar icecaps have melted with an accompanying rise of the oceans — useful for postapocalyptic campaigns. Click on the map for a larger version.

The Liberators as the New Oppressors

A successful and dramatic rebellion leads to the establishment of a free nation, well, that is the way fiction tends to portray revolutions. The reality is bleaker: when the smoke clears and the old tyrants dangle in the gallows, the new rulers too easily adopt the bad old ways to maintain their grip on power.

Professor Henning Melber, currently working at the University of Pretoria, once struggled actively against the against the South African apartheid regime; as a former insider he now explains how and why domestic politics did not turn for the better after the end of the racist governments in the five major countries of southern Africa — link >>>

Similar, and perhaps even more frightful, developments took place in south-east Asia after the violent eviction of the French and Dutch colonialists in the 1940s and 1950s. This is something that one should keep in mind when designing “realistic” rebel-themed campaigns and stories.